A selection of Climate Protection Fellows

Responsible for the contents: Dr Judith Schildt and Dr Tina-Maria Schieder (Humboldt Foundation) and the fellows

Abdelrhman Mahmoud Shaaban Mohamdeen

Degree: Bachelor of Science | Field: Earth Physics and Atmospheric Science | Affiliation at the time of application: Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs, Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency, Cairo, Egypt | Host institution in Germany: Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung – UFZ, Leipzig | Host: Professor Dr Uwe Schlink

Micrometeorological Studies of Urban Air in Cairo for the Mitigation of and Adaptation to Climate Change

Abdelrhman Mahmoud Shaaban Mohamdeen
Photo: Humboldt
Foundation/
Daniela Schmitter

The Mediterranean coastal region is densely populated with a large share of people living in urban areas and highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. A focal point of these current and future changes is the Greater Cairo region. Adaption and mitigation to global warming and the greenhouse effect are therefore the subjects of the project. Urban planning and the behaviour of the urban inhabitants can help to mitigate air pollution and regulate local temperatures in urban area. The study will look at the urban climate in Cairo, and downscale the atmospheric conditions to the level of individuals. Spatial analysis will be carried out with the help of measured and simulated urban climate data and socio-demographic data, to identify critical areas. A model is to be developed for a selected region of high thermal and air pollution stress in Cairo, so as to derive recommendations for the adaptation to demographic and climate changes.

Elizabeth Mosqueda

Degree: Master of Engineering | Field: Chemical Engineering | Affiliation at the time of application: Secretariat of Environment and Natural Resources (Environmental Ministry), Mexico | Host institution in Germany: Umweltbundesamt, Deutsche Emissionshandelsstelle, Berlin | Host: Dr Jürgen Landgrebe

Components for an Emission Trading Scheme in Mexico, a Policy Review of Mitigation Policies and Suggestions for Achieving their Targets

Elizabeth Mosqueda
Photo: Humboldt
Foundation/
Daniela Schmitter

In 2012, Mexico´s Congress enacted the General Climate Change Law establishing a series of policy and planning instruments to contribute to the design of the national climate change policy. The General Climate Change Law also sets the indicative objective or aspirational goal of reducing Mexico´s emissions by 30% over the baseline scenario by the year 2020, as well as achieving a 50% reduction in emissions by 2050, as compared with emission levels in the year 2000. To achieve these goals, the federal government has started to build the institutional, human resource and technological capacities that would underpin such reduction goals. The project aims to learn about the EU Emissions Trading Systems and its implementation in Germany, with a main focus on Monitoring, Reporting and Verification. Besides gaining an overview of the EU Emissions Trading System the research will cover a comparison of Germany’s and Mexico’s mitigation policies. As this research is focused on the Emissions Trading System Sector, Elizabeth Mosqueda will conduct a general analysis of the broad range of measures covered by the Emissions Trading System, from its main Monitoring, Reporting and Verification components to the details of the Emissions Trading System. In addition, data collection and reporting from other sectors/schemes will make it possible to provide recommendations for bringing Mexico’s policies into line with the country’s climate change policy. The results of this study will be submitted to the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources of Mexico.

Shalabh Poudyal

Degree: Master of Business Administration | Field: Biomass Engineering | Affiliation at the time of application: People, Energy and Environment Development Association (PEEDA), Kathmandu, Nepal | Host institution in Germany: SunCoal Industries GmbH, Ludwigsfelde | Host: Dr Tobias Wittmann

From Agro and Municipal Organic Wastes to Bio-coal: A Complete Value Chain Analysis for Climate Change Mitigation in Nepal

>Shalabh Poudyal
Photo: Humboldt
Foundation/
Daniela Schmitter

More than 60% of industrial energy in Nepal is derived from coal that is severely impacting the environment. Nepal has some sporadic deposits of low-grade lignitic coal and primary production of coal resources in the country is about 5% of total annual coal imports that amount to €9.3 million. CO2 emissions from burning coal in industries account for 24% of the total CO2 emissions in Nepal. Moreover, Nepal is an agricultural country and its potential production of agriculture residues is estimated at 23 million tonnes for the year 2011/2012. In addition to this, according to the Central Bureau of Statistics, Kathmandu Metropolitan City alone generated 457 metric tonnes of solid waste per day in the fiscal year 2012/2013, while the total amount of waste generated by the other 58 municipalities was around 670 metric tonnes per day. Of the total solid waste generated on a daily basis in Kathmandu Metropolitan City, 63.2% is organic while plastic, paper, and glass constitute 10.8%, 9% and 5.4% of the solid wastes respectively. These wastes are directly dumped into dumping zones without any segregation. Hence, the broad objective of this project is to enhance knowledge and understanding regarding the entire value chain nexus governing the conversion of agro and municipal organic wastes into bio-coal that is carbon neutral. The project will make it possible to understand the procurement and processing of raw materials, industrial conversion processes, human resource utilisation, marketing, institutional linkages, economic analysis and subsequent environmental protection. Moreover, the project will serve to identify the subsequent opportunities and challenges for the project's execution in Nepal.

Ravikash Prasad

Degree: Master of Science | Field: Environmental Science, Biology | Affiliation at the time of application: The University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fidschi | Host institution in Germany: Universität Würzburg, Abteilung für Tierökologie und Tropenbiologie | Host: Professor Dr. Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter

Impacts of Climate Change on the Distribution of Native and Invasive Bactrocera Fruit Flies and Consequent Yield Losses in Fiji and the Pacific Islands

Ravikash Prasad
Photo: Humboldt
Foundation/
Daniela Schmitter

Horticulture fruits and vegetables serve as staple food and complement the agricultural industries on which the economies of the Pacific islands rely on. However, the agricultural production system is threatened by fruit flies, which damage the commodities produced, increase cost of production due to costly treatment procedures, and slow trade by triggering quarantine restrictions. The project aims to study the potential impacts of the changing climatic parameters on the distribution, abundance, and effects of the native fruit flies Bactrocera passiflorea and the invasive fruit flies Bactrocera xanthodes in the Pacific Islands. The results would have potential for better pest risk analysis in the future for the Pacific Island countries and form the basis for better policies for protection against invasive insects. Since fruit flies are a major pest worldwide, and fruits are an important subsistence and commercial crop, the current research will also contribute towards understanding better food security in response to climate change globally.

Pulat Salikhov

Degree: Master of Engineering | Field: Energy Efficiency in Buildings | Affiliation at the time of application: Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, Institute of Energy and Automation, Tashkent, Uzbekistan | Host institution in Germany: Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Bauklimatik | Host: Professor Dr John Grunewald

Development of a Methodology for Evaluating Energy Efficiency and Thermal Comfort Measures at the Uzbekistan’s Rural Housing Design Level

Pulat Salikhov

Photo: Humboldt
Foundation/
Daniela Schmitter

Uzbekistan is the second-largest producer of CO2 (about 110 million tonnes of CO2 per year) in Central Asia, after Kazakhstan. Uzbekistan‘s continental climate leads to high energy consumption from residential heating, especially in badly insulated rural houses. As part of the government’s Rural Housing Programme, more than 10,000 new houses are built annually. This programme uses three standard designs: 3-, 4- and 5-bedroom rural houses.
In light of this, the Ministry of Economy of the Republic of Uzbekistan requested the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Department at the Institute of Energy and Automation to develop sets of energy efficiency measures for 3-, 4- and 5-bedroom rural houses. However, the Institute of Energy and Automation doesn’t have any methodology for analysing or evaluating the energy efficiency of the housing designs to be used for rural housing. Therefore this collaborative project aims to develop measures to improve energy efficiency and thermal comfort in typical rural houses in Uzbekistan on the basis of practical experience gathered in Germany.
The project intends to acquire technical knowledge from the Institute for Building Climatology of the Technical University of Dresden on energy efficiency and thermal comfort analysis methods by working on two real buildings. The strategic aim is to offer Uzbek families a more sustainable alternative that will help them improve their living conditions and avoid excessive energy consumption in their houses. Providing solutions for thermally comfortable and energy-efficient houses to the people of the Uzbek regions will increase their motivation for regional development and promote climate protection and reduced energy consumption. The ultimate aim of this project is to acquire specialist knowledge about these solutions and transfer it to the rural housing sector. A second objective is to disseminate energy-efficient methods and solutions to similar regions in Uzbekistan.

Anang Bagus Setiawan

Degree: Master of Science | Field: Wastewater Management | Affiliation at the time of application: BORDA Indonesia, Yogyakarta, Indonesia | Host institution in Germany: Atmosfair, Berlin | Host: Dr Robert Müller

Improving the Effectiveness of Biogas Usage through Monitoring and Evaluation of Decentralized Wastewater Treatment System (DEWATS) in Indonesia

Anang Bagus Setiawan
Photo: Humboldt
Foundation/
Daniela Schmitter

The management of sanitation and effluent in developing countries is increasingly challenging due to high rates of urbanization and increasingly dense, low-income urban and suburban areas. Decentralized sanitation systems serving multiple households are emerging as a feasible and cost-effective alternative to centralized systems. Their success at the pilot stage for many developing countries has led to rapidly increasing interest and rates of implementation, particularly in Indonesia. Yet ensuring the sustainable delivery of decentralized sanitation services over the long term remains a gap in critical knowledge and practice. One way to achieve better sanitation in Indonesia is to implement Decentralized Wastewater Treatment System (DEWATS) achieving sustainability of wastewater management systems. But referring to the data related to biogas usage of DEWATS Fiber, more than 80% of the biogas installation is not used properly, effectively and efficiently. Therefore the project tries to improve the effectiveness of biogas usage through monitoring, evaluation, the analyses of the current situation, and the development of core concepts and guidance materials for stakeholders and implementors so that the community around DEWATS plant could replace the use of firewood and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) to Biogas and hence reduce CO2 in atmosphere.

Wolke Tobón Niedfeldt

Degree: Master of Science | Field: Environmental Science | Affiliation at the time of application: National Commission for Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity (Conabio), Mexico | Host institution in Germany: Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung – UFZ, German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Leipzig | Host: Professor Dr Aletta Bonn

Restoration Planning in Mexico Considering Landscape Connectivity and Climate Change

Wolke Tobón Niedfeldt
Photo: Humboldt
Foundation/
Daniela Schmitter

Ecological restoration (ER) is widely recognized and essential for biodiversity conservation, especially considering the negative impact of human activities on ecosystems that is exacerbated by climate change. As suitable habitat has been reduced and fragmented by human activities, and species distributions are expected to shift in future climate, ER offers the opportunity to increase habitat and improve landscape connectivity enhancing the possibilities for species to move and disperse through the matrix of natural vegetation and other land uses. Thus, a fundamental question is where to focus the restoration efforts in order to support species and ecosystem persistence in the long term considering climate change. The study will address this problem for Mexico, a megadiverse country where large conservation gaps have been detected and biodiversity is strongly threatened by anthropogenic activities. The goal is to identify priority sites for ER at national level by a spatial multi-criteria analysis that incorporates biological and threat factors, particularly considering natural connected areas and climate change scenarios. It is expected to provide the results of this innovative approach to governmental and non-governmental institutions as a spatial guide to consolidate conservation and restoration goals for climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies.