Scholarly Integrity

10th Forum on the Internationalization of Sciences and Humanities

20 – 21 November 2016, Berlin

 

Scholarly integrity has become a major issue for universities, research institutions, and research (funding) organizations. Recently, allegations of plagiarism in the humanities and social sciences and disquieting news about low reproducibility rates in some fields of science have attracted attention within and beyond the academic world. Scholarly integrity is the prerequisite for a positive image of science and scholarship in the public eye, which is in turn indispensable to secure stable funding, to inspire the brightest young minds to pursue research careers, and ultimately also to enable new knowledge to take hold in society and develop an impact. As the issue is of such high importance for science and scholarship as a whole it has been widely discussed in a variety of academic and non-academic settings. At the center of these discussions have often been individual cases of misconduct as well as calls for better rules or appeals to stricter enforcement of existing ones. Less attention has so far been paid to diverging cultural attitudes towards scholarly integrity and to different forms of preventing scholarly misconduct across the globe. The 10th Forum on the Internationalization of Sciences and Humanities considered three dimensions of scholarly integrity in three consecutive panels, with a particular focus on how to prevent scholarly misconduct – against the backdrop of different cultural and regional approaches to the topic. On the level of the individual researcher, the meaning of scholarly integrity, as well as the challenges and pitfalls surrounding it, may differ between the various disciplines. On an institutional level, scholarly integrity might comprise a whole different set of challenges. Some scholarly misconduct may be promoted by complexities in the interplay between the different levels of hierarchy within a large research group, a university department or a research institute. And finally, from the perspective of research funding organizations, scholarly integrity raises the question of how much and in what detail those providing the money and thus ultimately in the position to set the rules of the game can and should become involved.

Participants at the 10th Forum on the Internationalization of Sciences and Humanities
10th Forum on the Internationalization of Sciences and
Humanities, Berli
n
Photo: Humboldt Foundation/David Ausserhofer

The 10th Forum on the Internationalization of Sciences and Humanities explored these various levels and dimensions by bringing together the perspectives of representatives of funding organizations as well as scholars and scientists from different academic disciplines, different cultural backgrounds, and different career stages.

Publication for Download

Scholarly Integrity
10th Forum on the Internationalization of Sciences and Humanities

More Information

Forum on the Internationalization of Sciences and Humanities

International Advisory Board

Contact

Alexander von Humboldt Foundation
Jean-Paul-Str. 12
53173 Bonn
Germany

Phone: +49 (228) 833 245
martin.schaffartzik(at)avh.de

Dr. Martin Schaffartzik
Program Director
Strategic Planning Division

Dr. Barbara Sheldon
Head of
Strategic Planning Division