A selection of Climate Protection Fellows

International Climate Protection Fellowship: Information about the fellowship and on how to apply 

Gilbert Baase Adum

Gilbert Baase Adum

Degree: Master of Philosophy | Field: Wildlife and Range Management | Affiliation at the time of application: Save the Frogs! Ghana, Kumasi, Ghana | Host institution in Germany: Museum für Naturkunde – Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions- und Biodiversitätsforschung, Berlin | Host: PD Dr Mark-Oliver Rödel

Assessing the Responsiveness of Ghanaian Amphibians to Global Change

Worldwide, many amphibian populations have been in continuous decline for the past four decades, often culminating in their extinction. Habitat loss and fragmentation, exacerbated by climate change are the most important proximate causes of species declines. The aim of this research project is to apply ecological niche modelling methods to gain baseline information on how Ghanaian most vulnerable species-endemic, rare and already endangered ones- are and will be faring under different global change scenarios and models. Species data will be compiled from existing collections and relevant databases, available at the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin. Ecological niche models will establish both current and potential future range shifts for each species. The results of this project will provide the benchmark for the development of appropriate conservation measures and a country-wide framework for the monitoring of amphibians in response to global change.

Gabriel Antwi-Boasiako

Gabriel Antwi-Boasiako

Degree: Master of Science | Field: Rural Development and Natural Resources Management | Affiliation at the time of application: Sustainable Livelihood Ghana | Host institution in Germany: Universität Bonn, Zentrum für Entwicklungsforschung ZEF | Host: Dr Eike Lüdeling

Towards Climate-smart Cocoa (Theobroma cacao) Production and Sustainability in Ghana

In recent times, cocoa (Theobroma cacao) production in Ghana has experienced a major decline. Climate change is considered to have aggravated complications in reestablishment due to high rates of cocoa seedling mortality and prolonged droughts. As a rule, climate change studies in Ghana have typically indicated considerable uncertainties about the value of empirical quantities. This makes it difficult to develop future climate scenarios, which in turn indirectly causes uncertainty regarding the costs and benefits of adaptation policies.
To date, existing studies have not extensively investigated how the climate will affect cocoa in terms of physiological processes (e.g. pollination and flowering), disease abundance and pest outbreaks, weed proliferation, water use potential or the rate of (i.e. faster or slower) growth. On the other hand, since real impact projections focus on drivers of production, exploring market demand, tree rejuvenation, pests and diseases, and consumer preferences will also be critical in this case.
During his stay in Germany, Gabriel Antwi-Boasiako and his host will develop a holistic, transdisciplinary model of cocoa system dynamics that can be used for predicting the future performance of cocoa in the face of climate change. They will use Bayesian Networks, a business analysis tool, to establish a robust benchmark for reasoning under uncertainty. This tool is also capable of taking different sources of information into account, including hard data and expert opinions. Its use will help the team make realistic recommendations for future climate projections and adaptation in Ghana's cocoa sector.

Danira Baigunakova

Danira Baigunakova

Degree: Master of Economics | Field: Economics | Affiliation at the time of application: JSC Zhasyl Damu, Astana, Kazakhstan | Host institution in Germany: Umweltbundesamt, Deutsche Emissionshandelsstelle, Berlin | Host: Dr Jürgen Landgrebe

Management of Allowences Reserve in Kazakhstans’s Emission Trading System

Domestic emission trading systems (ETS) are one of the carbon pricing tools of reduction GHG emissions and play a major role in the development of a country’s green economies. More and more countries start thinking about the implementation of domestic ETS. Kazakhstan is the first country in Central Asia, which has already implemented ETS. But, Kazakhstan’s ETS needs improvements, especially in the management of the allowances reserve. The reserve is an additional instrument for the government, which must be well managed. This requires clear rules and criteria to articulate, in which cases the reserve is used, what volume of allowances should be distributed or removed from the market, and how the reserve also can be used to influence the current market price. One of the composing goals of the project is to conduct scenario and uncertainty analysis using the Monte Carlo approach. In this project the experience of EU ETS will be learned more deeply with focus on upcoming market reserve stability. The results of this project will be provided to the Ministry of Energy of the Republic of Kazakhstan.

Maryam Bakhshi

Maryam Bakhshi

Degree: Master of Science | Field: Environment, Natural Resources Engineering | Affiliation at the time of application: Mona Consultants, Renewable Energy Department, Teheran, Iran | Host institution in Germany: Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin Centre for Caspian Region Studies | Host: Dr Behrooz Abdolvand

Bioenergy promotion strategies in Iran

Bioenergy derived from organic matter is a carbon-neutral source of energy in comparison with fossil fuels. Moreover, the decay of bio-based residues in conventional disposal systems leads to high greenhouse gas emissionsin the atmosphere which can be mitigated by energy recovery options. Iran’s large population as well as its diversity of crops and livestock provide different types of biomass resources. In spite of attempts by the Iranian government to stimulate renewable energies in the country, bioenergy development has only had limited success. Maryam Bakhshi’s research aims to evaluate Iran’s bioenergy potential. She wants to analyse different strategies to promote bioenergy and thus introduce strategies for greater use of bioenergy. Ms Bakhshi intends to propose a proper legal framework for sustainable biomass utilisation and, finally, to identify opportunities for mitigating climate change by promoting bioenergy in Iran.

Adam Ceesay

Adam Ceesay

Degree: Master of Science | Field: Climate Change and Tropical Marine Ecology | Affiliation at the time of application: Université Felix Houphouet-Boigny, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire | Host institution in Germany: Leibniz-Zentrum für Marine Tropenökologie | Host: Professor Dr Matthias Wolff

Mangrove Degradation and Socioeconomics of the Tanbi Wetland National Park, The Gambia

Like most countries in West Africa, The Gambia has suffered many climate-induced ecosystem changes. These are even more pronounced in the River Gambia estuary, where long-term hyper-salinity is a major contributor to mangrove degradation and fisheries decline. Located in the Sahelo-Sudanian climate zone, the River Gambia estuary suffers extensive floods during the peak rainy season as well as overwhelming salt intrusions during the peak dry season, leading to insufficient time for colonisation/succession by any given aquatic species. Conservation efforts during the past couple of decades have failed, as vulnerable coastal communities continue their daily socio-economic activities with little or even no hope for better yields. Adam Ceessay plans to use this research to assess the long-term change in mangrove vegetation and the changes in coastal micro-economies and to document local adaptation strategies of mangrove-dependent communities. This research will also provide useful recommendations for sustainable land use, as well as suggest alternative livelihoods for the major socio-economic groups in the wetland.

Aída Rocío García

Aída Rocío García

Degree: Master of Arts| Field: Public Management and Environmental Studies | Affiliation at the time of application: Ministry of Economy and Finance, Lima, Peru | Host institution in Germany: adelphi, Berlin | Host: Dennis Tänzler

Setting Sound Institutional Arrangements for Efficiently Handling Climate Finance in Peru

Climate finance has been largely recognised as a core element in climate discussions. There are two facts related to this element: First Climate finance is growing and secondly there is growing concern about the capacities of developing countries for making efficient use of available resources. In the past few years, the amount of Climate Finance flowing to Peru has increased substantially, and it is expected that it will continue growing in the years to come. Institutions in Peru, however, are not accustomed to handling major investments and this new scenario will confront them with a significant inflow of resources. The way Peru handles those resources will shape its capacity for leveraging additional Climate Finance.
Peru therefore needs to improve its capacity for accessing, managing, executing, monitoring and reporting Climate Finance. The very first step in this direction is the establishment of ad-hoc institutional arrangements that are best suited for handling Climate Finance efficiently. The main objective of this project is to develop a proposal for such arrangements.

Thi Binh Minh Hoang

Thi Binh Minh Hoang

Degree: Master of Science | Field: Geography | Affiliation at the time of application: Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Mientrung Institute for Scientific Research (MISR), Thua Thien Hue Province, Vietnam | Host institution in Germany: Unabhängiges Institut für Umweltfragen (UfU), Berlin | Host: Dr Michael Zschiesche

Making Planning for Energy Plant in Contaminated Soil Associated with Former Military Activity in Central Vietnam

The issue of climate change impacts is extremely serious in Central Vietnam where people are still dealing with the life-and-death effects of war-era environmental contamination. In light of this, remediation activities to expand areas for agriculture, reforestation and cultivation for underprivileged people who are struggling to survive under the pressures of climate change are of strategic importance. This project will identify links between climate change and soil protection. Thi Binh Minh Hoang will combine various types of databases: topography, slope, soil types, weather zones, sprayed areas and types of spray maps, watershed maps, bomb distribution and small topography. Besides exploring the potential for localising contaminated areas, the project will look for affordable strategies by using energy crops, public education and popular perceptions in tandem with historic research to build the knowledge base in preparation of remediation projects in the future.

Huihui Liu

Huihui Liu

Degree: Master of Civil and Commercial Law | Field: Environmental Law | Affiliation at the time of application: The Supreme People’s Court of China, Environment and Resources Division, Beijing, China | Host institution in Germany: Universität Münster, Institut für Umwelt- und Planungsrecht | Host: Professor Dr Sabine Schlacke

Sino-German Comparative Study of Air Pollution Litigation

Clean air is essential to the health of human beings and the environment. Germany’s successful experience in connection with protecting air quality and reducing pollutants, especially as regards the role that courts and judges have played in these areas, is very helpful for China. Collecting cases and documents in Germany, comparing the criminal, civil and administrative cases involving air pollution in China and Germany, ascertaining similarities and differences between the two countries in air quality protection in judicial terms are essential for judicial work in China. Lastly, the project will promote work being done to improve the judicial rules governing air pollution from the perspective of judicial organs, and affect legislation and administrative law enforcement from the judicial perspective so that problems and experience arising in connection with judgments can be subsequently reflected in legislation and regulations.

Abdelrhman Mahmoud Shaaban Mohamdeen

Abdelrhman Mahmoud Shaaban Mohamdeen

Degree: Bachelor of Science | Field: Earth Physics and Atmospheric Science | Affiliation at the time of application: Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs, Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency, Cairo, Egypt | Host institution in Germany: Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung – UFZ, Leipzig | Host: Professor Dr Uwe Schlink

Micrometeorological Studies of Urban Air in Cairo for the Mitigation of and Adaptation to Climate Change

The Mediterranean coastal region is densely populated with a large share of people living in urban areas and highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. A focal point of these current and future changes is the Greater Cairo region. Adaption and mitigation to global warming and the greenhouse effect are therefore the subjects of the project. Urban planning and the behaviour of the urban inhabitants can help to mitigate air pollution and regulate local temperatures in urban area. The study will look at the urban climate in Cairo, and downscale the atmospheric conditions to the level of individuals. Spatial analysis will be carried out with the help of measured and simulated urban climate data and socio-demographic data, to identify critical areas. A model is to be developed for a selected region of high thermal and air pollution stress in Cairo, so as to derive recommendations for the adaptation to demographic and climate changes.

Elizabeth Mosqueda

Elizabeth Mosqueda

Degree: Master of Engineering | Field: Chemical Engineering | Affiliation at the time of application: Secretariat of Environment and Natural Resources (Environmental Ministry), Mexico | Host institution in Germany: Umweltbundesamt, Deutsche Emissionshandelsstelle, Berlin | Host: Dr Jürgen Landgrebe

Components for an Emission Trading Scheme in Mexico, a Policy Review of Mitigation Policies and Suggestions for Achieving their Targets

In 2012, Mexico´s Congress enacted the General Climate Change Law establishing a series of policy and planning instruments to contribute to the design of the national climate change policy. The General Climate Change Law also sets the indicative objective or aspirational goal of reducing Mexico´s emissions by 30% over the baseline scenario by the year 2020, as well as achieving a 50% reduction in emissions by 2050, as compared with emission levels in the year 2000. To achieve these goals, the federal government has started to build the institutional, human resource and technological capacities that would underpin such reduction goals. The project aims to learn about the EU Emissions Trading Systems and its implementation in Germany, with a main focus on Monitoring, Reporting and Verification. Besides gaining an overview of the EU Emissions Trading System the research will cover a comparison of Germany’s and Mexico’s mitigation policies. As this research is focused on the Emissions Trading System Sector, Elizabeth Mosqueda will conduct a general analysis of the broad range of measures covered by the Emissions Trading System, from its main Monitoring, Reporting and Verification components to the details of the Emissions Trading System. In addition, data collection and reporting from other sectors/schemes will make it possible to provide recommendations for bringing Mexico’s policies into line with the country’s climate change policy. The results of this study will be submitted to the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources of Mexico.

Shalabh Poudyal

Shalabh Poudyal

Degree: Master of Business Administration | Field: Biomass Engineering | Affiliation at the time of application: People, Energy and Environment Development Association (PEEDA), Kathmandu, Nepal | Host institution in Germany: SunCoal Industries GmbH, Ludwigsfelde | Host: Dr Tobias Wittmann

From Agro and Municipal Organic Wastes to Bio-coal: A Complete Value Chain Analysis for Climate Change Mitigation in Nepal

More than 60% of industrial energy in Nepal is derived from coal that is severely impacting the environment. Nepal has some sporadic deposits of low-grade lignitic coal and primary production of coal resources in the country is about 5% of total annual coal imports that amount to €9.3 million. CO2 emissions from burning coal in industries account for 24% of the total CO2 emissions in Nepal. Moreover, Nepal is an agricultural country and its potential production of agriculture residues is estimated at 23 million tonnes for the year 2011/2012. In addition to this, according to the Central Bureau of Statistics, Kathmandu Metropolitan City alone generated 457 metric tonnes of solid waste per day in the fiscal year 2012/2013, while the total amount of waste generated by the other 58 municipalities was around 670 metric tonnes per day. Of the total solid waste generated on a daily basis in Kathmandu Metropolitan City, 63.2% is organic while plastic, paper, and glass constitute 10.8%, 9% and 5.4% of the solid wastes respectively. These wastes are directly dumped into dumping zones without any segregation. Hence, the broad objective of this project is to enhance knowledge and understanding regarding the entire value chain nexus governing the conversion of agro and municipal organic wastes into bio-coal that is carbon neutral. The project will make it possible to understand the procurement and processing of raw materials, industrial conversion processes, human resource utilisation, marketing, institutional linkages, economic analysis and subsequent environmental protection. Moreover, the project will serve to identify the subsequent opportunities and challenges for the project's execution in Nepal.

Ravikash Prasad

Ravikash Prasad

Degree: Master of Science | Field: Environmental Science, Biology | Affiliation at the time of application: The University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fidschi | Host institution in Germany: Universität Würzburg, Abteilung für Tierökologie und Tropenbiologie | Host: Professor Dr. Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter

Impacts of Climate Change on the Distribution of Native and Invasive Bactrocera Fruit Flies and Consequent Yield Losses in Fiji and the Pacific Islands

Horticulture fruits and vegetables serve as staple food and complement the agricultural industries on which the economies of the Pacific islands rely on. However, the agricultural production system is threatened by fruit flies, which damage the commodities produced, increase cost of production due to costly treatment procedures, and slow trade by triggering quarantine restrictions. The project aims to study the potential impacts of the changing climatic parameters on the distribution, abundance, and effects of the native fruit flies Bactrocera passiflorea and the invasive fruit flies Bactrocera xanthodes in the Pacific Islands. The results would have potential for better pest risk analysis in the future for the Pacific Island countries and form the basis for better policies for protection against invasive insects. Since fruit flies are a major pest worldwide, and fruits are an important subsistence and commercial crop, the current research will also contribute towards understanding better food security in response to climate change globally.

Pulat Salikhov

Pulat Salikhov

Degree: Master of Engineering | Field: Energy Efficiency in Buildings | Affiliation at the time of application: Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, Institute of Energy and Automation, Tashkent, Uzbekistan | Host institution in Germany: Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Bauklimatik | Host: Professor Dr John Grunewald

Development of a Methodology for Evaluating Energy Efficiency and Thermal Comfort Measures at the Uzbekistan’s Rural Housing Design Level

Uzbekistan is the second-largest producer of CO2 (about 110 million tonnes of CO2 per year) in Central Asia, after Kazakhstan. Uzbekistan‘s continental climate leads to high energy consumption from residential heating, especially in badly insulated rural houses. As part of the government’s Rural Housing Programme, more than 10,000 new houses are built annually. This programme uses three standard designs: 3-, 4- and 5-bedroom rural houses.
In light of this, the Ministry of Economy of the Republic of Uzbekistan requested the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Department at the Institute of Energy and Automation to develop sets of energy efficiency measures for 3-, 4- and 5-bedroom rural houses. However, the Institute of Energy and Automation doesn’t have any methodology for analysing or evaluating the energy efficiency of the housing designs to be used for rural housing. Therefore this collaborative project aims to develop measures to improve energy efficiency and thermal comfort in typical rural houses in Uzbekistan on the basis of practical experience gathered in Germany.
The project intends to acquire technical knowledge from the Institute for Building Climatology of the Technical University of Dresden on energy efficiency and thermal comfort analysis methods by working on two real buildings. The strategic aim is to offer Uzbek families a more sustainable alternative that will help them improve their living conditions and avoid excessive energy consumption in their houses. Providing solutions for thermally comfortable and energy-efficient houses to the people of the Uzbek regions will increase their motivation for regional development and promote climate protection and reduced energy consumption. The ultimate aim of this project is to acquire specialist knowledge about these solutions and transfer it to the rural housing sector. A second objective is to disseminate energy-efficient methods and solutions to similar regions in Uzbekistan.

Anang Bagus Setiawan

Anang Bagus Setiawan

Degree: Master of Science | Field: Wastewater Management | Affiliation at the time of application: BORDA Indonesia, Yogyakarta, Indonesia | Host institution in Germany: Atmosfair, Berlin | Host: Dr Robert Müller

Improving the Effectiveness of Biogas Usage through Monitoring and Evaluation of Decentralized Wastewater Treatment System (DEWATS) in Indonesia

The management of sanitation and effluent in developing countries is increasingly challenging due to high rates of urbanization and increasingly dense, low-income urban and suburban areas. Decentralized sanitation systems serving multiple households are emerging as a feasible and cost-effective alternative to centralized systems. Their success at the pilot stage for many developing countries has led to rapidly increasing interest and rates of implementation, particularly in Indonesia. Yet ensuring the sustainable delivery of decentralized sanitation services over the long term remains a gap in critical knowledge and practice. One way to achieve better sanitation in Indonesia is to implement Decentralized Wastewater Treatment System (DEWATS) achieving sustainability of wastewater management systems. But referring to the data related to biogas usage of DEWATS Fiber, more than 80% of the biogas installation is not used properly, effectively and efficiently. Therefore the project tries to improve the effectiveness of biogas usage through monitoring, evaluation, the analyses of the current situation, and the development of core concepts and guidance materials for stakeholders and implementors so that the community around DEWATS plant could replace the use of firewood and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) to Biogas and hence reduce CO2 in atmosphere.

Wolke Tobón Niedfeldt

Wolke Tobón Niedfeldt

Degree: Master of Science | Field: Environmental Science | Affiliation at the time of application: National Commission for Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity (Conabio), Mexico | Host institution in Germany: Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung – UFZ, German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Leipzig | Host: Professor Dr Aletta Bonn

Restoration Planning in Mexico Considering Landscape Connectivity and Climate Change

Ecological restoration (ER) is widely recognized and essential for biodiversity conservation, especially considering the negative impact of human activities on ecosystems that is exacerbated by climate change. As suitable habitat has been reduced and fragmented by human activities, and species distributions are expected to shift in future climate, ER offers the opportunity to increase habitat and improve landscape connectivity enhancing the possibilities for species to move and disperse through the matrix of natural vegetation and other land uses. Thus, a fundamental question is where to focus the restoration efforts in order to support species and ecosystem persistence in the long term considering climate change. The study will address this problem for Mexico, a megadiverse country where large conservation gaps have been detected and biodiversity is strongly threatened by anthropogenic activities. The goal is to identify priority sites for ER at national level by a spatial multi-criteria analysis that incorporates biological and threat factors, particularly considering natural connected areas and climate change scenarios. It is expected to provide the results of this innovative approach to governmental and non-governmental institutions as a spatial guide to consolidate conservation and restoration goals for climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies.

Hinweis

Responsible for the contents: Dr Judith Schildt and Dr Tina-Maria Schieder (Humboldt Foundation) and the fellows